Volume 12, Issue 3 (vol-3 2006)                   Horizon Med Sci 2006, 12(3): 22-28 | Back to browse issues page

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Abstract:   (14338 Views)
Abstract: Background and Aim: Recently attentions to intensive care unit environments is essential because of multiplied disadvantages of undesirable environment in high risk newborn therefore determination and collection of standards for accurate practice in hospital and health centers. Materials and Methods: This research is a multiple triangulation done in years 2004-2006. First international standards were extracted from world wide webs. The using Delphi method, these standards as well as the view points of 15 clinical medical sciences experts were complied to set suggested standards in environmental health finding and in the third stage, 42 clinical medical sciences experts of the country were selected. And their suggestions were investigated regarding desirability and applicability of these standards to the executive and sociocultural situations in Iran through a descriptive survey method. The results of this stage were analyzed via descriptive statistics. Results: In the first stage standards were extracted of lo controls and states. The suggestions and assertions made by experts regarding the suitability and applicability to the environmental situations in Iran were studied and standards in environmental health were drafted and were finally approved by an 80-100 desirability percent rate. Conclusion: The findings of the third step of the research showed that most of the environmental health standards had either appropriate or fairly appropriate level. So necessary changes in final standards have been made based on subjects, viewpoint and suggestions facilities standards suggested for Iran. The findings of this research are hoped to contribute to the enhancement of the quality in Iran.
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Type of Study: Original | Subject: Basic Medical Science
Received: 2007/07/14 | Published: 2006/09/15